Thursday, June 24, 2010

GBMWolverine is moving

Posted at 8:00am -- 6/24/2010

GBMWolverine followers,

Our site, GBMWolverine, has moved to http://GBMWolverine.com/ which is a part of the FanSided network, so please bookmark our new site into your favorites.

At this time the previous blogspot site will be idle.

We will be shutting down the current message board as well. We will have a message board that goes with the new site that will enable readers easier access to the new message board. Please note, you will have to register to post on the new message board.

The move is in response to an opportunity that appeared rapidly. GBMWolverine sees an advantage to being a part of a national sports fans blog network, but will absolutely still retain the deep rooted and independent Michigan outlook. The site will remain a place where fans can participate in our blog and be able to discuss Michigan athletics.

The staff has concluded strongly that being a part of the fansided network will not only benefit the site and also the readership. Simply put, over the long haul there will be more information.

The network affiliation is http://fansided.com/ and the network covers the NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, and has recently started coverage of NCAA sports and individual programs.

The succeeding content will not really be of a new format, the staff will continue past practice regarding answering e-mail questions, writing football breakdowns during the season, and breaking down the football commits, and offering recruiting profiles. The site will continue to cover hockey, basketball, etc. and as we mentioned in a previous article the site is going to expand Michigan football recruiting coverage.

Please comment on our GBMWolverine Message Board about this article and read what others comment and give us your thoughts, agree or disagree.

Just a reminder you must be a member to participate on the Message Board. Here is the link GBMWolverine Register for those people interested in becoming a member.

You can contact us at our e-mail address: GBMWolverine

Follow us on Twitter:
@ErocWolverine
@GBMWolverine
@Mike Fitzpatrick
@YostMeister  

Written by GBMWolverine Staff  

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!

 

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

2011 Michigan Football Recruiting: Dee Hart


Posted at 8:00am -- 6/22/2010

2011 Michigan Football Recruiting: Today’s Spotlight on Dee Hart

Dee Harts improvement from the sophomore film to junior film is striking. One reason, among many, for this improvement is simple physical maturation. Hart is noticeably thicker in the thighs and has not lost any of his quickness or acceleration. He has excellent hands catching the ball out of backfield and maintains good body lean and pad level.

What impressed GBMW the most were Dee’s super hips, he cuts on a dime with no loss of speed. More than the recent running back recruits, Dee is a great fit for the Michigan zone schemes.



Why is Dee Hart important to Michigan recruiting? The Rich Rodriguez (Michigan) version of the spread offense depends heavily on two positions, quarterback and tailback. For this offense to be clicking points off at a high pace, both the quarterback and running back must be of the highest caliber, at least near All-America talent level. Two guys who can take it all the way on any given play, in any given yardage situation, is what makes the offense click. With moderate talent at quarterback and running back, ball control goes out the window and only moderate or even flat mediocre results will result.

Michigan has improved at the quarterback position and the next two years could bring a performance level nearing Pat White (time will tell). But the running back position is not of the same ilk. Vinnie Smith is a nice control runner that can frequently get 2-5 yards (maybe UM could actually benefit more from control than the quick strike). But Vinnie is not going to break Slaton type runs. None of the other running backs have proved much, period. Give some credit however, the entire stable was working very hard this spring.

Dee Hart can take it to the house better than anyone on the current roster. He has a lot of talent and like Vinnie Smith and Jeremy Gallon is a very good athlete who can play football.

Dee Hart would give this offense a chance of being a true two-headed monster. One head may not be enough to get the team to the next level.

Written by GBMW Staff

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!


Tuesday, June 22, 2010

GBMW: Were Expanding Coverage


Posted at 8:00am -- 6/22/2010

GBMW: Were Expanding Coverage

GBMW has always promised to seriously consider suggestions from our much-appreciated followers. As a result, GBMW is going to be adding more recruiting coverage to the blog page. The breakdowns of Michigan recruits and associated scouting reports have been very well received both here and on other web sources. As a result, the staff will extend recruiting coverage.

GBMW typically covered Michigan commitments with our breakdowns and film evaluations that we normally do. Also, GBMW covered recruiting as a result of mailbag e-mails, questions about certain recruits, areas of recruiting, or how the staff thought recruiting was going. More recently, GBMW has hit the sideline for scouting and published stories about local Ohio and Michigan recruits.

The site has decided to expand its presence in the recruiting domain to not only benefit our viewers, but also to expand coverage of Michigan football, by discussing who UM is recruiting. There will be some, limited carry-over to other sports as well.

GBMW is planning on doing one or two breakdowns a week of potential Michigan recruiting targets. These might not be recruits that are high on Michigan, or high on the Michigan coaches’ list, but we think some of the recruits should either look at Michigan or Michigan should look at them. Also, the site is going to at least attempt to set this up so to be on a certain day, so the readership will know when to expect recruiting news.

This might be a slow time in covering Michigan football right now (nothing seems too slow at UM circa 2010), but things behind the scenes are picking up and expanding recruiting coverage becomes an opportunity for a more informative site.

The staff has not forgotten the other sports that GBMW covers, but the main focus will remain football because that is our overriding expertise. GBMW will continue the great hockey coverage with Yostmeister and also “dabble” in basketball, softball, baseball and everything else on the Michigan campus.

As always the site will value the e-mail questions and will continue printing and answering those as well. The mailbag questions, as earlier stated, have helped make this site much bigger than the staff envisioned when GBMW started.

By adding to the site, all of us hold the objective of retaining loyal readers and gaining new ones. The plan now is to grow by providing great information and highly independent material. There is more to the growth plan and some information may be made available soon at GBMW.

Written by GBMW Staff

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!


Monday, June 21, 2010

Dhanil Tackles the Globe -- Nepal


Posted at 4:00pm -- 6/21/2010

Big Ten Expansion Alignment Possibilities


Posted at 8:00am -- 6/21/2010

Big Ten Expansion Alignment Possibilities

Many have weighed in about the conference realignment, that is, the grouping of the conference teams into two divisions.

Some takes are geographic in nature, such as north/south, east/west, while some seek to balance the power between the two divisions, paying little heed to geography.

We at GBMW, like many of you, are still debating on which potential alignment is best, not only for Michigan but also the conference. It would be unfortunate to have the conference split into two divisions and be dominated by one division, like we have seen in Big Twelve football.

Regardless of the eventual number of teams and the eventual alignment, an important query is does the Big Ten conference, with twelve teams, play another conference game or will the league keep scheduling eight conference games?

Some at GBMW strongly favor the continuance of rivalry games. On the other hand perhaps now is a good time to have both members of each perceived rivalry voice agreement or disagreement as to whether the game should be mandated as an annual date on the schedule. If a team wants out of an annual game, and have the traditional opponent placed in the general rotation, this is the time to switch. Will some teams only have one mandated rivalry game, while others have two? Will all number one designated rivalry games be played the last week of the season, or will the conference start rotating this factor as well?

So, the debate of what is best naturally must start with where to place Michigan and Ohio State. Most here agree that "The Game" needs to be played at the end of the year and should remain an annual event. The Big 12 made a huge mistake when the conference took away one of college football’s best rivalries, Oklahoma and Nebraska, which those among us who are seasoned enough remember being played on Thanksgiving weekend. The stakes were very high in many of those classic games.

Does the conference place Michigan and Ohio State into separate divisions or in the same division, eliminating the possibility of the two rivals playing on back-to-back weekends?

Some predictably want both in the same division to continue the strength of "The Game.” The game may never be diminished but some wind may be taken out of the sail if both teams do not play annually.

Many, certainly Michigan fans, wanted to see a re-match between Ohio State and Michigan after the 2006 game, where Michigan lost 42-39 at Ohio Stadium. Ohio State fans didn't want to see this since they were on the winning side. ESPN certainly did not want to see a rematch as well. The only reason Columbus fans would want a rematch would be to achieve the distinction of beating Michigan twice in the same year.

Jerry Dinardo of the Big Ten Network set up his realignment and we like the three different scenarios, but which one is the best for the conference over the long haul, after all the ups and downs of individual teams run the course? Which grouping could raise the Big Ten Conference to a new level or which grouping could have a negative impact by turning the Big Ten into a lop-sided arrangement?

Jerry Dinardo East/West Divisions

East:
Indiana
Michigan
Michigan State
Ohio State
Penn State
Purdue

West:
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Nebraska
Northwestern
Wisconsin

Obviously in our opinion the East division is the better division with three solid programs in Michigan, Ohio State and Penn State.

The West division has Nebraska and Wisconsin, neither now as strong as OSU or PSU. Yes, Iowa has lately contended for the league title in the Big Ten Conference, and Wisconsin remains solid.

Here, Michigan and Ohio State are in the same division so no worry about a carry over game. In this scenario Michigan could have the Minnesota game as a carry over game to play for the Little Brown Jug every year since Michigan State and Ohio State are in Michigan’s division.

A common problem with any divisional scenario is some of the big games would be rotated off the schedule, such as Nebraska vs. Michigan or Wisconsin vs. Michigan. Yes, good match-ups were also lost in the 11 team, one division, Big Ten conference.

Assuming there will be two divisions, we would like to see new rivalries started, such as Ohio State and Nebraska playing every year in a crossover game. There are many factors that support this game, most importantly both are historical programs of national stature. This gives OSU a second rivalry, whereas Michigan still has three rivalry games in Ohio State, Notre Dame, and Michigan State.

Jerry Dinardo North/South Divisions

North:
Illinois
Michigan
Michigan State
Minnesota
Northwestern
Wisconsin

South:
Indiana
Iowa
Nebraska
Ohio State
Penn State
Purdue

In this grouping the south division appears to be the better division, with Ohio State, Nebraska and Penn State as members.

Now, if Michigan State can continue to raise the football program then maybe this would provide good balance between the two divisions.

The schedule would involve playing everybody in the division plus one annual crossover game, rotating the rest of the opposite division teams on and off the schedule.

This grouping has more games that would need to be carried over as crossover games, such as Michigan/Ohio State, Minnesota/Iowa, Illinois/Indiana, Michigan State/Penn State, Wisconsin/Nebraska, and Northwestern/Purdue.

Or does the league just divide the power teams like everybody did as a kid at recess?

Dinardo Plan:

Bo:
Michigan
Nebraska
Michigan State
Minnesota
Iowa
Illinois

Woody:
Ohio State
Penn State
Wisconsin
Purdue
Indiana
Northwestern

Crossover Games assigned to the above alignment:
Michigan/Ohio State
Nebraska/Purdue
Michigan State/Penn State
Iowa/Wisconsin
Illinois/Northwestern
Minnesota/Indiana

In this scenario you split Michigan and Ohio State, obviously, and seem to have power teams being balanced out.

Sure, in this division set-up (like the other set-ups) one division may each year appear tougher, but that will happen, especially with programs such as Iowa, Michigan State, and others that can be contenders one year and the next year are back in the middle of the pack. Some teams have to be on a 3-4 year plan to contend for the conference title, while others, such as Ohio State, do this every year.

One of the major factors, beside what to do with Ohio State and Michigan, is the extra expenses that teams will have with travel. Minor sports will face extra travel time and expenses, likely covered in part by the extra income the conference will generate. The effect of alignment is important to basketball as well.

So, of the three division plans which one is best for Michigan, what is best for the Big Ten Conference, and what is best for college football as a whole? Smart people are looking into this decision and the rest of us wait with interest.

Written by GBMW Staff

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!


Friday, June 18, 2010

Mailbag question: USC players


Posted at 8:00am -- 6/18/2010

Mailbag question: USC players

Hey guys, great stuff lately as always. Just a quick question, a couple of years ago we were recruiting a kid out of the PSL (I think) named Nick Perry. He was one of the top DE's in the country for that class. We thought we were in it but he ultimately chose USC.

So my question is now with the USC sanctions allowing players to leave without sitting out a year might he come back home? If not him are there others who may be interested?

Keep up the good work!!

Tom T.

------------------------

Thanks for the question.

That is a tough question, and any maybe is not even in the early developmental stage. USC is still going to be on national TV a ton, so exposure is not a problem.

USC is still going to attract NFL scouts in droves. so that is not an issue.

Defenders like Nick Perry will be playing for one of the most respected DC's in the business in Coach Kiffin. Coach Carroll and many other noted coaches credit him as a mentor, a plus for the USC program.

Players like Perry, who have limited eligibility remaining, are less likely to transfer, but it is not out of the question. Ronald Johnson likely will not come back to Michigan, among many factors not in Michigan’s favor is the style of offense and how the split ends have been used the last couple of years at Michigan certainly would be unattractive to a potential high draft pick.

Is it possible either would come back? Possible, yes, but highly unlikely in our opinion -- we could see either going to Michigan State before Michigan.

People need to remember that no matter how Michigan fans can minimize what is going on in Ann Arbor, others around the country have a different perception.

So, not many players would want to leave a team like USC soon to be under sanctions to go to another team like Michigan that has been investigated, self-penalized, and are waiting on the NCAA in August for final sanctions.

Now if the NCAA ruling had came out earlier then we could possible see USC players looking into Michigan, but since nothing will be finalized until mid-August that means that the players would have to trust the word of coaches they really don't know, an unlikely scenario after being burned by coaches they did trust.

This is a situation that is bad for the current USC players, because they are at a place they wanted to be part of, and in most cases the current USC players were not even in high school when these events occurred. They will be the ones that have to suffer the consequences, not the school, the president, the current head coach, the previous head coach, the assistant coaches, the athletic director, boosters, or former players.

Written by GBMW Staff

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!


Thursday, June 17, 2010

Mailbag question: Making excuses


Posted at 8:00am -- 6/17/2010

GBMW,

Does it seem like Michigan has become the "excuse" program lately, at least by some sites?

It does appear that plenty of blame for all the problems surrounding the football program has been levied to many, excepting the people in charge of the program and the university.

Excuses are like "you know what" and everybody has them. I want to see results on the field -- isn't that what really matters?

Your thoughts please?

Craig R. From Syracuse, NY.

------------------------------------------

Thanks for the question.

Our opinion has been consistent since the beginning of this entire (semi or total) fiasco; there is plenty of blame to go around. A venture as big as Michigan football may have only one Captain, but there are plenty of mates, and all have a meaningful purpose and delegated assignment(s) past the decoration or figurehead status.

Many old expressions could be used concerning the past 18 to 24 months. “Another fine mess”, “I know nothing,” fill in your own here ____________________________. The current football program’s status, while not in shambles, is messy and it is a flat out shame.

There are many good guys on this site who wish a time eraser could turn back some pages and create better results. But Alice left Wonderland and the Grinch has dropped in by parachute.

Sooner or later, good people, seeking to rebuild the foundational support and restore the prestige of the Michigan football program, will carefully analyze the inglorious and very sorrowful mysteries floating around the Wolverine world like whispy ghosts. This is/was the expectation of the NCAA and the vehicle for explanation was Michigan’s report.

Our staff collectively does not believe the potential position that the Michigan football staff should be insulated from ANY blame in the current “situations.”

Again, as in past mailbox responses, coaches are in charge of understanding and applying the institutional rules and are also in charge of the Michigan football program in actuality, not by a de facto status. As the old saying goes "the buck stops here". This is an old saying the NCAA believes in.

Just as accurately, the coaches should not be made to assume “full blame” for all the happenstance that has quickly turned a mildly bubbling pot into a high-end vortex. No one short of administrative status is in a position to place a quantitative or qualitative amount of blame on any single individual (yes, names were named). Finding of fact, already undertaken, can (assuming a good process) clearly demonstrate: (1) a flow chart of responsibilities; (2) who or what entity had assigned responsibility; (3) the timeframes involved; (4) documented attempts to comply with prescribed duties and timelines, and (5) errors committed during the process and the nature of the errors.

This is not that difficult, hundreds of sports programs successfully navigate through this maze annually. Yes, the paperwork is thick and the context can be somewhat vague, but there are dozens of people within an athletic department along the assignment continuum and the NCAA has an available phone line.

Frankly, it should become obvious that many people and departments made mistakes of omission or commission, and in the normal path of such events individuals are held accountable, either in an actual vein or as a scapegoat. In any big enterprise, intra and interdepartmental happenings can fall through the cracks or fall victim to bad communication. The nature of the failings here, far exceed a normal/typical threshold of error.

There will be quick (and further) scurrying in August when the NCAA comes down off the mountain and gives the judgment (yea or nay) to Michigan’s suggested remedy to the allegations, whereupon, the commandments will be issued, and some housecleaning may result out of necessity. There is nothing pleasant for the university staff that will have to live through this personal nightmare for the next two months, or longer.

The biggest, and maybe the only, possibility of a silver lining is a well thought out and well-managed compliance plan that should put the program on good administrative footing in future times.

Concerning other sites, we will give our comments solely on these happenings. Our viewpoints, like every other enterprise assessing the blame game, are not privy to a finding of fact in totality or guaranteed certain accuracy. Even those in the midst of the actual process cannot likely guarantee a perfect final product based on perfectly accurate findings.

Just like the BP situation, many of the players in this several act comedy (or tragedy) are trying to cover their buttocks and their pocketbooks (livelihood). By the way, everyone here knows that football is a game and the Gulf situation is a disaster that pales any athletic program malfunction.

Again, this situation can best be described as, “It is what it is.” Sometime in the future this somewhat depressing novel will be traded in, rewritten, or edited for a better chapter of Michigan football. That comment is directed at administrative method, anticipated change, and program success, not personnel from any branch of the football program or university departments.

Written by GBMW Staff

Go Blue -- Wear Maize!


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